Do we value women’s work?

// 11 November 2015

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Global Women’s Strike argue it’s time to stand up for women’s unpaid care work.

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It is forty years since the women of Iceland took a Day Off and brought the country to a halt and 20 years since we won a commitment from governments celebrating the UN Decade for Women to include the value of women’s unwaged work in their national accounts. Yet women are still the poorer sex, doing two thirds of the world’s work, including growing most of the food. We care for children and for sick, disabled and elderly people, in the family and outside, in war as in peace. Society cannot survive without caring, yet carers are undermined not supported.

An uncaring market

The economic and social priorities that dismiss the carer are determined not by people’s health and well-being, or even the survival of the planet which sustains all life, but by the global market. In 90% of UK families the primary carer is a woman. 79% of austerity cuts have targeted women, that is carers and those we care for. While the 1% more than doubled their income in the last 10 years and the arms trade has risen by 22%, 1 billion children worldwide live in poverty, 3.7m in the UK and 176,565 surviving on food banks.

Michelle Dorrell spoke for many on BBC Question Time when she attacked government plans to take away tax credits. “I can hardly afford the rent I have to pay. I can hardly afford the bills I’ve got to do, and you’re going to take more from me. Shame on you!” Many go without so their children can eat. Many do two or three low paid jobs. Many do sex work to pay the rent. Even junior doctors (60% of whom are women under 30) are being targeted: pressured to work longer for less and to lose their maternity protection.

We have got used to measuring sexism by how many women have made it to the commanding heights of the economy and politics. Professor Alison Wolf has attacked as a “betrayal of feminism” this “modern obsession” with women at the top, while the poorly paid mainly women shift workers on which these “golden skirts” depend, are ignored.

We are told that a job, any job, is better than caring

When Nadiya Jamir Hussain won the Great British Bake Off she said she was “proud to represent stay-at-home mums” and spoke about the “negativity” she had to face in an age when mothers are expected to prove their worth by going out to work: “As a mum that was quite tough.”

Selma James, co-ordinator of the GWS, points to the neglect of the carer and the people who need care as the basis of sexism. “They don’t want women to have the power that our reproductive work should earn. We are told that a job, any job, is better than caring, and the skills it requires are undervalued and underfunded even in the job market – domestic work, homecare, childcare and even nursing are low paid. Caring is not just an industry profiting from our needs, but the perspective of a movement which is demanding that the market be at the service of people rather than people at the service of the market.”

A living wage for all, including mothers and other carers

Working with Women, the policy of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn, recognises caring as skilled work; the SNP promises to raise carer’s allowance and the Greens propose a basic income for all. And what about technology cutting the working day rather than wages so we all have time to care? What about redirecting economic and social policies by paying all workers, including mothers, a living wage? That would make people and the planet which sustains us all the priority, rather than banks and businesses; help bridge the income gap between women and men; and attract more men to caring.

The International Women’s Conference, Caring, Survival and Justice vs the Tyranny of the Market takes place in London on Saturday 14 & Sunday 15 November.

Called by: Global Women’s Strike, Women of Colour in GWS, 
Payday (network of men working with GWS). Speakers Tickets
020 7482 2496 • gws@globalwomenstrike.net

Comments From You

Jackie Bather // Posted 20 November 2015 at 1:31 pm

Caring has become totally denigrated as a worthwhile way, to spend one’s life. It has no academic or financial standing, therefore no status either. I chose to be a stay-at-home mother and the ability to choose, is of course, dependent on many factors and I acknowledge these, even though I was educated to degree level and could have pursued a career. Feminism means being able to make informed choices and I made mine. I have no regrets whatsoever. Even so, when, over the years I have been asked what my employment was, my answer was usually met with a resounding silent awkwardness, from the company present.

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