Articles by D H Kelly

Echoes of Section 28

30 years after the Local Government Act 1988 was passed, D H Kelly describes what it was like to grow up under Section 28 and notices uncanny echoes in modern day transphobia

D H Kelly // 29 May 2018

Categories: Education, Features, Politics and Current Affairs, Sex and Relationships

We need to live before we’re helped to die

D H Kelly argues that disabled people’s anti-euthanasia argument is a fundamentally anti-capitalist one

D H Kelly // 20 December 2017

Categories: Body and Health, Features, Politics and Current Affairs

Why are bisexual TV characters such complete jerks?

Bisexual characters remain rare on our TV screens, but D H Kelly notices that when they do appear, they are overwhelmingly sketchy and occasionally villainous

D H Kelly // 29 November 2017

Categories: Reviews, Television

Shedding light in dark places

D H Kelly is moved and impressed by the way that The Keepers focuses on the survivors of violence and the mystery of a murder rather than the perpetrators of such violent crimes

D H Kelly // 3 November 2017

Categories: Television

Why are men so worried about false allegations?

In the midst of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, D H Kelly wonders why some men allow fears about false allegations to distract them from what's really going on

D H Kelly // 25 October 2017

Categories: Blog

In defence of Strictly

D H Kelly considers the heteronormativity of Strictly Come Dancing and explores how to overhaul the gender norms it promotes

D H Kelly // 28 September 2017

Categories: Reviews, Television

I believe in straight people

A study claims to prove than straight women lie about their same-sex desires, but D H Kelly argues that what people say about their own sexual orientation remains the most accurate information we have on the subject

D H Kelly // 26 August 2017

Categories: Blog

It’s time to simplify the gender recognition process

D H Kelly makes the case for a simpler gender recognition process for trans and non-binary people

D H Kelly // 21 August 2017

Categories: Body and Health, Features, Politics and Current Affairs

Imaginary families and the Social Care crisis

For Blogging Against Disablism Day, D H Kelly discusses the sexist, ageist and disablist ideas which maintain the social care crisis

D H Kelly // 1 May 2017

Categories: Blog

All singing, all dancing, all rather toxic

D H Kelly enjoys the brilliant comic songs in Crazy Ex-Girlfriend but is disappointed by the show’s treatment of mental ill health and its reliance on toxic heteronormative romantic messages

D H Kelly // 25 March 2017

Categories: Reviews, Television

Unsexy women: Love, sex and marginalised bodies

In a culture which categorises some groups of women as unattractive, D H Kelly explores how this has an effect far beyond whether or not we find love or get laid

D H Kelly // 8 July 2016

Categories: Body and Health, Features, Racism, Sex and Relationships

Believing Amber Heard is about believing all victims

Nobody wants to think ill of their heroes, but D H Kelly explains how defending famous men by attacking their accusers makes it harder for all victims to speak out

D H Kelly // 30 May 2016

Categories: Blog

We need to avoid disablism when we talk about abortion

On Blogging Against Disablism Day, D H Kelly argues that it's possible to support a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy without undermining the dignity of disabled people

D H Kelly // 1 May 2016

Categories: Blog

Is it time for gender neutral toilets?

Gender segregated toilets are something we take for granted, but D H Kelly argues that gender neutral public toilets might be better for everyone

D H Kelly // 28 March 2016

Categories: Blog

On sexism and immigration

Responding to David Cameron's concerns about the isolation of migrant Muslim women, D H Kelly highlights the ways in which our immigration system is indirectly sexist and can put women at risk

D H Kelly // 22 January 2016

Categories: Blog, Uncategorized

Dickensian fails to meet great expectations on female characterisation

D H Kelly watches a BBC drama set within Charles Dickens' novels, finding a selection of uncomplicatedly likeable young women, whose journeys to old age lack the development allowed for the men of the stories

D H Kelly // 19 January 2016

Categories: Reviews, Television

Breaking up is hard to do

In the week of the year which sees a boost in business for divorce lawyers, D H Kelly discusses our cultural reluctance to accept that some relationships must come to an end

D H Kelly // 6 January 2016

Categories: Blog

The problem with Kylie Jenner’s photo shoot is not about looking sexy in a wheelchair

A photo shoot in a US magazine sparks controversy over featuring Kylie Jenner using a wheelchair. D H Kelly examines the disablism of both this image and in much of the criticism

D H Kelly // 3 December 2015

Categories: Blog

Man up or grow a pair

D H Kelly explores the contradictory uses of the word "man" to depict both personal strength and childish insecurity

D H Kelly // 24 November 2015

Categories: Blog

A guide to bisexuality in Britain can’t come soon enough

D H Kelly discusses the position of bisexual women and a crowd-funded book which might make a difference

D H Kelly // 9 November 2015

Categories: Blog

An image of a sand sculpture depicting two figures leaning against one another's shoulders.We could all benefit from learning about consent

D H Kelly argues that our cultural ideas about consent are confused and contradictory and we could all benefit from learning more about it

D H Kelly // 3 November 2015

Categories: Blog

Demigoddess PenthesileaDiscussing sexuality without reinforcing patriarchy

D H Kelly responds to an article which, in discussing the author's own sexuality, risks reinforcing cultural ideas which make many people feel they are sexually abnormal

D H Kelly // 2 October 2015

Categories: Blog

Authenticity in a sci-fi world

D H Kelly watches Sense8 and finds a realistic depiction of human sexuality

D H Kelly // 18 August 2015

Categories: Reviews, Television

A spiraling stairwellLosing housing benefit will put young women in danger

The Welfare Reform Bill is abolishing housing benefits for adults under 21. D H Kelly explains why this will put young people at greater risk of domestic violence

D H Kelly // 27 July 2015

Categories: Blog

We need to stop talking about triggers and start talking about access

D H Kelly argues that the semantics of "trigger warnings" is perpetuating a harmful debate

D H Kelly // 21 July 2015

Categories: Education, Features

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