Articles about 'oppression'

Wonder Woman wouldn’t fight for the IDF

Andrea Marks-Joseph responds to the mainstream feminist movement's reaction to the 2017 Wonder Woman film

Andrea Marks-Joseph // 12 July 2017

Categories: Features, Films, Politics and Current Affairs

I wore men’s clothes for a month – and it changed my life

Motivated by Octieber and determined to combat the world of gendered clothing, Lucy Rycroft-Smith tries menswear for a month and documents her findings

Lucy Rycroft-Smith // 7 January 2017

Categories: Fashion and Image, Features

How parents oppress their mixed race children

Our monthly guest blogger Nicola points out that mixed race children can face oppression from their monoracial parents, who shouldn't claim expertise around being mixed race

Nicola // 20 July 2016

Categories: Blog

The illusion of neutrality

Although in an ideal world, we would be able to judge situations neutrally, our guest blogger Nicola explains how often judgements are biased in the favour of oppressors

Nicola // 7 July 2016

Categories: Blog

New review: Black Mirror’s ’15 Million Merits’ and ‘White Bear’

Gemma Varnom takes a second glance at Black Mirror‘s ’15 Million Merits’ and ‘White Bear’ episodes and wonders if we are inching ever closer to the horrifying and oppressive society...

Holly Combe // 7 February 2015

Categories: Blog

“And you just watched”

Gemma Varnom takes a second glance at Black Mirror's '15 Million Merits' and 'White Bear' episodes and wonders if we are inching ever closer to the horrifying and oppressive society they depict

Gemma Varnom //

Categories: Reviews, Television

Exceptions won’t change the rules

Amelia Handy muses on the aspirational formula behind The Apprentice and argues that quotas recommending the 'add-woman-and-stir' recipe to companies are not good enough when we have an economic system that values profit over people

Guest Blogger // 12 December 2014

Categories: Blog

New review: Masters of Sex

Ailsa Bristow looks at the second season of Masters of Sex and finds an approach to sexual awareness that is unashamedly political and unafraid of challenging viewers. This review contains...

Holly Combe // 13 November 2014

Categories: Blog

“All taboos feel dangerous until they’re broken”

Ailsa Bristow looks at the second season of Masters of Sex and finds an approach to sexual awareness that is unashamedly political and unafraid of challenging viewers

Ailsa Bristow //

Categories: Reviews, Television

All About That Bass? All about that body shaming

Veena Chandar takes issue with 'All About That Bass' and its implication that we should only appreciate our bodies if boys admire them

Guest Blogger // 22 October 2014

Categories: Blog

The silent strong woman

Nayla Ziadeh argues that the fetishisation of exceptional female achievement encourages the systems of oppression which manifest the need for this super human resilience

Nayla Ziadeh // 12 May 2014

Categories: Culture and Media, Features, Feminism, Stereotypes

On ‘toxic Twitter feminism’ and being called out

Sarah describes 'Twitter feminism' as 'feminism that includes minority voices' and puts being 'called out' in perspective

Sarah Thomasin // 1 February 2014

Categories: Blog

Transforming perceptions to create change

Tabasum Wolayat argues that the stereotyping of Afghan women by people in the West needs to end, so we can all work together in a common struggle for freedom

No Women No Peace // 1 April 2013

Categories: Blog

A voice of liberation

Tabasum Wolayat speaks out against foreign stereotyping of Afghan women

No Women No Peace // 11 March 2013

Categories: Blog

Man haters?

The accusation that feminists hate men is simply anti-feminist propaganda; there's no point wasting our time engaging with this distracting argument, says Laura

Laura // 3 October 2012

Categories: Blog

Song of the day: Gossip – Standing in the Way of Control

There is more to this song than lending itself well to scenes of partying, hedonism and bear suits

Holly Combe // 8 September 2012

Categories: Blog

Song of the day: Nina Simone/various – Strange Fruit

Nina Simone's chilling version of Abel Meeropol's shockingly candid description of a quiet rural scene in the aftermath of racist murder

Holly Combe // 22 August 2012

Categories: Blog

Song of the day: Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five – The Message

Socially conscious hip-hop co-produced by Sugar Hill founder Sylvia Robinson

Holly Combe // 28 July 2012

Categories: Blog

When it comes to issues of equality, it’s not size that counts

A guest post from Lisa Glass criticising framings of gender equality as a minor issue in comparison to other human rights concerns

Guest Blogger // 25 March 2012

Categories: Blog

New review: The Selecter’s Made in Britain

“I think we were probably the first [band] to start talking about racism and actually take -if you like- the race question out there and start informing people about it.”...

Holly Combe // 20 March 2012

Categories: Blog

Made in solidarity: The Selecter in the 21st century

The Selecter brought us their 2 Tone sound when right wing politics was dividing a nation. Helen G reviews their most recent release Made in Britain and finds their music -new and old- to be as relevant today as their most famous tracks were in the 1980s

Helen G //

Categories: Music, Reviews

Strip club

A guest post by Rosie, in which she talks about how her ideas of feminism clashed with her reaction to her husband visiting a strip club. Some readers may find the subject matter triggering, so please approach with caution.

Guest Blogger // 18 March 2012

Categories: Blog

Can’t you take a joke?

The thing about the phrase "Can't you take a joke?" is that it isn't usually anything to do with trying to make anyone laugh

katyha // 7 January 2012

Categories: Blog

New feature: After Banaz Mahmod, where is the justice for victims of honour-based violence?

Five years after Banaz Mahmod’s murder, it’s time for the government to get serious on honour-based violence, argues Fionnuala Murphy from the Iranian and Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation Five and...

Jess McCabe // 23 August 2011

Categories: Blog

After Banaz Mahmod, where is the justice for victims of honour-based violence?

Five years after Banaz Mahmod's murder, it's time for the government to get serious on honour-based violence, argues Fionnuala Murphy from the Iranian and Kurdish Women's Rights Organisation

Fionnuala Murphy //

Categories: Politics and Current Affairs, Violence

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